This semester I am taking ANM 372 Drawing for Features Storyboarding with Disney Story Artist Tamara Lusher-Stocker. I am chronicling my experience on the blog for myself and for those interested in learning more about storytelling. I highly recommend trying your hand at the assignments we were given. Happy boarding!

“Get the audience by the throat. Don’t let them escape. Don’t wake them up. Don’t let them stop and realize ‘this is only a movie.'” – Billy Wilder

Today we showcased the character we found from life and expanded upon for our upcoming storyboard assignment.

While at the Walt Disney Family Museum last weekend I saw a fascinating young woman wearing an electric blue fluffy bear hat, a Wizard of Oz style Dorothy Gale dress, purple tights and motorcycle boots. The moment I saw her I knew I found my muse.

Wearing purple tights and a blue hat are bold choices. One decides to dress that way, that style does not randomly happen upon a person. I imagined her to be a creative, fun, Zooey Deschenel type of woman. In my mind, she loves eclectic fashion, her Etsy site where she sells her own creations, animals, playing guitar, wears her heart on her sleeve and spends little time on the phone. Here are my ideas for my character:

 

Imogene Expressions 2
Imogene Expressions 1
Imogene expressions 1
Imogene expressions 2
Imogene standing
Imogene standing
Imogene sketches
Imogene sketches
Imogene meets a fluffy friend
Imogene meets a fluffy friend
Imogene sews
Imogene sews
Imogene argues with her phone
Imogene argues with her phone
Imogene holds an umbrella
Imogene holds an umbrella

After each person in the class showed their character, Tamara gave us our assignment – our character baking a cake in 40 to 60 panels.

We also gleaned some words of wisdom to aid us in our quest.
Some excellent rules to live by:

To Be A Great Story Artist, You Need To…

1. Use your draftsmanship. Draw everything. Everywhere. All the time. Draw, draw, draw.
2. Draw AND discuss film language. Know what different shots mean and when to use them.
3. Act – you are an actor with a pencil.
4. Write – understand story structure and how to tell a visually compelling dramatic story.
5. Have a keen eye and ear. You know how Pinocchio is timeless while a lot of direct to DVD films out now have a shelf life of six months? Learn how to tap into the human psyche without being the hot thing of the moment.
6. Be flexible and humble. Carol Kieffer Police said something excellent at the Walt Disney Museum yesterday: “your plans are always meant to humble you in the end.” Things will not always go as planned. Your great idea may be ripped off the wall and tossed in the trash. Roll with it. Know when the bigger story is more important than your one cool scene.

We also discussed different types of boards, of which there are three:

1. Beat Boards – these are panels or illustrations that show the scope of an entire film. These are the fancy ones you often see in all those beautiful hard cover art of books.

2. Pitch Boards – panels that represent all the changes that occur within a film, including film shots and character emotional changes. I learned something cool here too – the more boards to show an action the slower the action will seem. The fewer the number of boards the faster the action will seem.

3. Continuity boards for an animatic or story reel – panels that play together as an animatic. A good example is the “100 mile Dash” sequence in the special features of The Incredibles.

For next week I’ll show my boards for our first assignment I call “A Cake Story.”

Until next time…

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